Tim Retout's www presence

Sun, 01 Jan 2017

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

Apparently I failed to write a blog entry in all of 2016, and almost all of 2015. Probably says something profound about the rise of social media, or perhaps I was just very busy. I bet my writing has suffered.

I have spent the last few days tidying up and clearing out clothes, bits of paper, and wires. I think there's light at the end of the tunnel.

Posted: 01 Jan 2017 23:17 | Tags:

Sat, 17 Jan 2015

CPAN PR Challenge - January - IO-Digest

I signed up to the CPAN Pull Request Challenge - apparently I'm entrant 170 of a few hundred.

My assigned dist for January was IO-Digest - this seems a fairly stable module. To get the ball rolling, I fixed the README, but this was somehow unsatisfying. :)

To follow-up, I added Travis-CI support, with a view to validating the other open pull request - but that one looks likely to be a platform-specific problem.

Then I extended the Travis file to generate coverage reports, and separately realised the docs weren't quite fully complete, so fixed this and added a test.

Two of these have already been merged by the author, who was very responsive.

Part of me worries that Github is a centralized, proprietary platform that we now trust most of our software source code to. But activities such as this are surely a good thing - how much harder would it be to co-ordinate 300 volunteers to submit patches in a distributed fashion? I suppose you could do something similar with the list of Debian source packages and metadata about the upstream VCS, say...

Posted: 17 Jan 2015 22:01 | Tags:

Thu, 15 Jan 2015

Docker London Meetup - January 2015

Last week, I visited London for the January Docker meetup, which was the first time I'd attended this group.

It was a talk-oriented format, with around 200 attendees packed into Shoreditch Village Hall; free pizza and beer was provided thanks to the sponsors, which was awesome (and makes logistics easier when you're travelling there from work).

There were three talks.

First, Andrew Martin from British Gas spoke about how they use Docker for testing and continuous deployment of their Node.js microservices - buzzword bingo! But it's helpful to see how companies approach these things.

Second, Johan Euphrosine from Google gave a short demo of Google Cloud Platform for running Docker containers (mostly around Container Engine, but also briefly App Engine). This was relevant to my interests, but I'd already seen this sort of talk online.

Third, Dan Williams presented his holiday photos featuring a journey on a container ship, which wins points from me for liberal interpretation of the meetup topic, and was genuinely very entertaining/interesting - I just regret having to leave to catch a train halfway through.

In summary, this was worth attending, but as someone just getting started with containers I'd love some sort of smaller meetings with opportunities for interaction/activity. There's such a variety of people/use cases for Docker that I'm not sure how much everyone had in common with each other; it would be interesting to find out.

Posted: 15 Jan 2015 07:45 | Tags: ,

Fri, 02 Jan 2015

Decluttering

Kate's been reading some book or other by KonMari. Hence we've rehomed lots of clothes, books and DVDs to charity and various places.

I am told the key is to ask, "Does this item bring me joy?" Then if it doesn't bring you enough joy, it goes. The nice thing was, it was actually exciting to reveal the gems among my bookshelves, which were previously hidden by a load of second-rate books.

True story: I was sitting downstairs deciding whether to splash out £25 for a particular book. Was called upstairs to make some 'joy decisions', and saw the very same book on the shelf already. Fast delivery!

Posted: 02 Jan 2015 21:52 | Tags:

Thu, 01 Jan 2015

Looking back at 2014

I have a tendency to forget what I've been up to - so I made a list for 2014.

I started the year having recently watched many 30c3 videos online - these were fantastic, and I really should get round to the ones from 31c3. January is traditionally the peak time for the recruitment industry, so at work we were kept busy dealing with all the traffic. We'd recently switched the main job search to use Solr rather than MySQL, which helped - but we did spend a lot of time during the early months of the year converting tables from MyISAM to InnoDB.

At the start of February was FOSDEM, and Kate and I took Sophie (then aged 10 months) to her first software conference. I grabbed a spot in the Go devroom for the Sunday afternoon, which was awesome. Downside: we got horribly ill while in Brussels.

At work I was sorting out configuration management - this led to some Perl module backporting for Debian, and I uploaded Zookeeper at some point during the year as well. We currently make use of vagrant, chef and a combination of Debian packages and cpanm for Perl modules, but I have big plans to improve on that this year.

Over a break from work I hacked up apt-transport-tor, which lets you install Debian packages over the Tor network. (This was inspired by videos from 30c3 and/or LibrePlanet, I think?) Continuing the general theme of paranoia, I attended the Don't Spy On Us campaign's day of action in June.

Over the summer at work I was experimenting with Statsd and Graphite for monitoring. I also wrote Toggle, a Perl module for feature flags. In July I attended a London.pm meeting for the first time, and heard Thomas Klausner talk about OX - this nudged me into various talks at LPW (see below). Pubs have a lot to answer for.

At some point I got an IPv6 tunnel working at home (although my ISP-provided router's wireless doesn't forward it), and I had an XBMC install going on a Raspberry Pi as another fun hack.

In August and September I worked on packaging pump.io for Debian, and attended IndieWebCamp Brighton, where I delivered a talk/workshop on setting up TLS. (This all ties in to the paranoia theme.) I stalled the work on pump.io, partly because of licensing issues at build-dependency time (if you want to run all the tests) - but I expect I'll pick this up in 2015 once jessie is released.

November was the London Perl Workshop, where I presented my work from the summer on statsd/graphite and Toggle, and a Bread::Board lightning talk. LPW was more enjoyable for me this year than previous years, probably because of the interesting people discussing various aspects of how feature flags ought to work. Simultaneously was the Cambridge MiniDebConf (why do these always clash?) where I think I fixed at least one RC bug.

This is not an exhaustive list of everything I've done this year - there are more changes now lined up for 2015 which I haven't shared yet. But looking back, I'm pleased that the many small experiments I get up to do add up to something over time, and I can see that I'm achieving something. Here's to another year!

Posted: 01 Jan 2015 21:38 | Tags:

Sun, 31 Aug 2014

Website revamp

This weekend I moved my blog to a different server. This meant I could:

I've tested it, and it's working. I'm hoping that I can swap out the Node.js modules one-by-one for the Debian-packaged versions.

Posted: 31 Aug 2014 22:04 | Tags: , ,

Thu, 28 Aug 2014

Pump.io update 1

[The story so far: I'm packaging pump.io for Debian.]

4 packages uploaded to NEW:

  • node-webfinger
  • validator.js
  • websocket-driver
  • node-openid

2 packages eliminated as not needed:

  • set-immediate - deprecated
  • crypto-cacerts - not needed on Debian

1 package in progress:

  • node-databank

Got my eye on:

  • oauth-evanp - this is a fork with two patches, so I need to investigate the status of those.
  • node-iconv-lite - needs files downloaded from the internet, so I'm considering how to add them to the source package
  • dateformat/moment - there's an open discussion about combining Node.js modules, and I'm wondering if these are affected.

Thoughts

Currently I'm averaging around one package upload a day, I think? Which would mean ~1 month to go? But there may be challenges around getting packages through the NEW queue in time to build-depend on them.

Someone has asked my temporary Twitter account whether I have a pump.io account. Technically, yes, I do - but I don't post anything on it, because I want to run my own server in the long term. As part of running my own server, I always find that easier if I'm installing software from Debian packages. Hence this work. Sledgehammer, meet nut.

Posted: 28 Aug 2014 13:59 | Tags: ,

Sat, 23 Aug 2014

Packaging pump.io for Debian

I intend to intend to package pump.io for Debian. It's going to take a long time, but I don't know whether that's weeks or years yet. The world needs decentralized social networking.

I discovered the tools that let me create this wiki summary of the progress in pump.io packaging. There are at least 35 dependencies that need uploading, so this would go a lot faster if it weren't a solo effort - if anyone else has some time, please let me know! But meanwhile I'm hoping to build some momentum.

I think it's important to keep the quality of the packaging as high as possible, even while working through so many. It would cost a lot of time later if I had to go back and fix bugs in everything. I really want to be running the test suites in these builds, but it's not always easy.

One of the milestones along the way might be packaging nodeunit. Nodeunit is a Nodejs unit testing framework (duh), used by node-bcrypt (and, unrelatedly, statsd, which would be pretty cool to have in Debian too). Last night I filed eight pull requests to try and fix up copyright/licensing issues in dependencies of nodeunit.

Missing copyright statements are one of the few things I can't fix by myself as a packager. All I can do is wait, and package other dependencies in the meantime. Fortunately there are plenty of those.

And I have not seen so many issues in direct dependencies of pump.io itself - or at least they've been fixed in git.

Posted: 23 Aug 2014 09:24 | Tags: , , ,

Fri, 25 Jul 2014

London.pm's July 2014 tech meeting

Last night, I went to the London.pm tech meeting, along with a couple of colleagues from CV-Library. The talks, combined with the unusually hot weather we're having in the UK at the moment, combined with my holiday all last week, make it feel like I'm at a software conference. :)

The highlight for me was Thomas Klausner's talk about OX (and AngularJS). We bought him a drink at the pub later to pump him for information about using Bread::Board, with some success. It was worth the long, late commute back to Southampton.

All very enjoyable, and I hope they have more technical meetings soon. I'm planning to attend the London Perl Workshop later in the year.

Posted: 25 Jul 2014 08:36 | Tags: ,

Tue, 22 Jul 2014

Cowbuilder and Tor

You've installed apt-transport-tor to help prevent targeted attacks on your system. Great! Now you want to build Debian packages using cowbuilder, and you notice these are still using plain HTTP.

If you're willing to fetch the first few packages without using apt-transport-tor, this is as easy as:

  • Add 'EXTRAPACKAGES="apt-transport-tor"' to your pbuilderrc.
  • Run 'cowbuilder --update'
  • Set 'MIRRORSITE=tor+http://http.debian.net/debian' in pbuilderrc.
  • Run 'cowbuilder --update' again.

Now any future builds should fetch build-dependencies over Tor.

Unfortunately, creating a base.cow from scratch is more problematic. Neither 'debootstrap' nor 'cdebootstrap' actually rely on apt acquire methods to download files - they look at the URL scheme themselves to work out where to fetch from. I think it's a design point that they shouldn't need apt, anyway, so that you can debootstrap on non-Debian systems. I don't have a good solution beyond using some other means to route these requests over Tor.

Posted: 22 Jul 2014 22:31 | Tags: , , ,

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